HITECH Act

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2014: New year promises better medical care through high technology

Marika Sboros | Business Day | December 31, 2013

From smart clothes, to genome editing, cell therapy, patient-centred medical homes, virtual house calls and "benevolent bribes" — 2014 is set to usher in a new era of precise, effective, and best of all, preventative treatments for a range of health problems and diseases. Read More »

Behavioral Health's EHR Conundrum

Tom Sullivan | Healthcare IT News | March 12, 2014

March 12, 2014-Behavioral health and long-term post-acute care are perhaps the two most significant areas left out of the meaningful use program. “When we look at the big circle of care, there’s a huge hole -- behavioral health,” said Mark Caron, CIO of Capital Blue. “Behavioral health is a mess.” And at least similar words could be used to describe the status of EHR implementation in many long-term and post-acute care settings.

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CORAnet Solutions Champions Patients’ Medical Record Access with Its Personal Health Information Exchange

It has been six years since the HITECH Act passed, yet most Americans seeking medical care are still unable to obtain their full medical records for a variety of reasons whether the hospital will not release them or proprietary EHR system vendors will not allow hospitals, let alone patients, direct access. One Healthcare 2.0 leader, CORAnet Solutions, has developed a tool that finally allows patients access to their complete medical records. This new breakthrough technology enables patients to take control of their personal medical data with CORAnet’s Personal Health Information Exchange (PHIE).

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Crash Test Dummies and Electonic Health Records

EHR vendors are quick to say that the upcoming stage 3 Meaningful Use requirements are too burdensome, that they are too difficult to complete, and they are not necessary. (see this article for example). Many EHR vendors would say let market forces take over and the Health IT industry will heal itself. The big business interests of the Healthcare industry may cry wolf (and lobby hard) against the meaningful use program and its significant enhancements to the usability program because they don’t want to spend the extra time and money to provide a healthcare system that truly follows a safety-enhanced design philosophy.

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Death By A Thousand Clicks: Leading Boston Doctors Decry Electronic Medical Records

Drs. John Levinson, Bruce H. Price and Vikas Saini | WBUR | May 17, 2017

It happens every day, in exam rooms across the country, something that would have been unthinkable 20 years ago: Doctors and nurses turn away from their patients and focus their attention elsewhere — on their computer screens. Read More »

Doctors like EHRs even less than they did five years ago

Jack McCarthy | Healthcare IT News | August 13, 2015

But do the clinicians, physicians, nurses and specialists actually using the software like EHRs any more than they did five years ago? No, they do not, at least according to the results of a study published by the American Medical Association and the American College of Physicians' AmericanEHR division. Physicians, rather, have are grown increasingly dissatisfied with their electronic health records software during the last five years.

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DoD And Tech Firms Face Daunting Health-IT Challenge

John K. Higgins | eCommerce Times | September 22, 2014

"The DoD's electronic health record program is a large and extremely complex undertaking. There are a number of different vendors, players, technologies, organizations and politics involved, resulting in tremendous barriers to overcome," said eHealth Initiative CEO Jennifer Covich Bordenick. "That doesn't mean it is impossible to execute DHMSM successfully -- but it will be a difficult feat."...

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Funding Opportunities for Building Data Connections Between EMS and Healthcare Partners

Press Release | NHTSA Office of EMS | September 1, 2016

EMS providers often treat patients with complicated medical histories yet have no access to relevant health data, such as hospital or out-patient records, which might provide information critical to patient care. EMS reports also are rarely integrated into hospital records, leaving specialists and other hospital staff unaware of how patients presented to EMS initially and what treatments they received prior to arriving at the emergency department...Earlier this year, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) published a guidance letter that allows the use of Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) funds for expenditures related to electronically connecting Eligible Providers to other Medicaid providers, including EMS, to share health information.

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Guess What: Docs Don't Like EHRs

It's kind of "dog-bites-man" type news, but there is even more evidence that physicians not only don't think EHRs are helping them but actually see them as contributing to burnout. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic found that use of EHRs (or computerized physician order entries -- CPOEs) was associated with lower satisfaction with time spent on clerical tasks, with nearly half of physicians saying the amount of time spent on clerical tasks was unreasonable.  No wonder the AMA CEO recently complained that physicians were turning into the "most expensive data entry force on the face of the planet."

Health IT Now recommends HHS, Congress take steps against non-interoperable systems

Marla Durben Hirsch | FierceEMR | June 18, 2014

Health IT Now, buoyed by RAND's recent report on electronic health records, has called on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and Congress to "decertify systems that require additional modules, expenses, and customization to share data," and to investigate business practices that prohibit or restrict data sharing in federal incentive programs.

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Healthcare players are actively blocking data sharing

Lucas Mearian | Computerworld | April 15, 2015

Five years ago, only 20% of physicians used electronic medical records (EMRs). Today, 80% use them. Since the enactment of the HITECH Act, which required that EMRs be adopted across all healthcare providers, the federal government has invested more than $28 billion toward their use...

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Healthcare players are actively blocking data sharing

Lucas Mearian | Computerworld | April 15, 2015

Five years ago, only 20% of physicians used electronic medical records (EMRs). Today, 80% use them. Since the enactment of the HITECH Act, which required that EMRs be adopted across all healthcare providers, the federal government has invested more than $28 billion toward their use.

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HIEs Struggle with Sustainability

Anthony Brino | Government Health IT | July 11, 2013

More providers than ever are participating in health information exchanges, at the same time that a majority of HIE organizations are struggling to find sustainable business models, a new study has found. Read More »

Humetrix Presents Disruptive Personal Health App Solutions Before US Congress

As a former practicing physician, data scientist and public health officer, I became a healthcare IT entrepreneur focusing on mobile technology because I believed that the best way to treat patients, improve health outcomes, and reduce waste is to put patients’ critical health information into their own hands, so they can share that information with their physicians when needed. With 68 percent of Americans using a smart phone daily1, and new HIPAA rules giving each of us a legal right to electronically access our health records, consumer facing mobile health applications can be a cure to the information blocking which is still plaguing our health care system. In a healthcare environment in which one-third of expenditures are wasted3 on redundant care, and medical errors representing the third leading cause of death in the U.S. today4, having immediate access to a patient’s health history can literally save lives and also significantly reduce healthcare costs.

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Hurricanes Harvey and Irma Draw the Line - Time for the US to Embrace Open Source Emergency and Disaster Response

For nearly 20 years now the global open source community and applications have been a keystone to disaster relief efforts around the world. The enormous number of disaster relief applications and knowledge that has been developed through all these years, should, and needs to be leveraged in the current crisis. For that reason Open Health News is starting a series of articles to highlight some of the most important solutions. A substantial portion the open source applications for emergency and disaster response that exist are actually already in the news website in the form of articles and resource pages.

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