Stanford University

See the following -

17-Year-Old Invents $35 3D Printed Device for Diagnosing Respiratory Diseases

Tess | 3Ders | August 23, 2017

Not many teens can say they attend an Ivy League school and perhaps even fewer can claim an invention to their name. This is not the case for 17-year-old Maya Varma, an engineering student and intern at Stanford University who has developed a low-cost 3D printed device that can analyze a patient’s breath and help to diagnose pulmonary diseases. Across the globe, hundreds of millions of people suffer from respiratory conditions such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and restrictive lung disease. In fact, respiratory diseases and infections are the third leading cause of death, after cancer and heart disease...

Read More »

A Bionic Eye That Restores Sight

Rachel E. Gross | The Atlantic | August 31, 2014

By bridging the gap between eye and brain, a new device has the capacity to help the blind regain their vision...

Read More »

Aero-Engineers Debut Open-Source Fluid Dynamics Design Application

Andrew Myers | PhysOrg.com | January 24, 2012

At a recent demonstration, the Stanford team debuted "Stanford University Unstructured" (SU2), an open-source application that models the effects of fluids moving over aerodynamic surfaces such as fuselages, hulls, propellers, rotors, wings, rockets and re-entry vehicles. Read More »

Apple Is Quietly Working on Turning Your iPhone into the One-Stop Shop for All Your Medical Info

Christina Farr | CNBC | June 14, 2017

Imagine turning to your iPhone for all your health and medical information — every doctor's visit, lab test result, prescription and other health information, all available in a snapshot on your phone and shared with your doctor on command. No more logging into hospital websites or having to call your previous doctor to get them to forward all that information to your new one. Apple is working on making that scenario a reality...

Read More »

Cardiologist Eric Topol on Why We Need to Map the Human Body and “Go Deep” with Big Data

Press Release | Stanford Medicine | May 25, 2017

This year’s Big Data in Biomedicine conference included a passionate talk from cardiologist Eric Topol, MD, of The Scripps Research Institute. Topol, who has been named one of the most influential physician leaders in the United States, described in gripping detail what’s wrong with medical care today and why we need to move forward to the kind of individualized medicine that can make for healthier individuals and healthier populations...

Read More »

Documents Reveal How Poultry Firms Systematically Feed Antibiotics To Flocks

Brian Grow, P.J. Huffstutter and Michael Erman | Reuters | September 15, 2014

Major U.S. poultry firms are administering antibiotics to their flocks far more pervasively than regulators realize, posing a potential risk to human health.  Internal records examined by Reuters reveal that some of the nation’s largest poultry producers routinely feed chickens an array of antibiotics – not just when sickness strikes, but as a standard practice over most of the birds’ lives...

Read More »

Four PLOS authors receive 2016 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences

Through the Breakthrough Prize – initiated and funded in 2012 by Bay Area biotechnology innovators, social media venture capitalists and successful internet entrepreneurs – outstanding scientists working in the fields of life sciences, fundamental physics and mathematics receive recognition, money and a bit of glamour. This year, four of the five scientists awarded a $3 million Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences chose to publish some of their work in Open Access journals over the course of their careers. In so doing, Edward S. Boyden, Karl Deisseroth, John Hardy and Svante Pääbo ensure their research is available for distribution, discovery and reuse, introducing opportunities for all scientists to build on their discoveries...

Read More »

Free software models how humans move

Andrew Myers | Stanford University | November 1, 2011

An open source software application modeling human motion is helping medical professionals and bioengineers study, diagnose, and correct abnormalities in how people move. Read More »

Google launches Project Bloks, a New Open Hardware Platform for Teaching Kids to Code

Frederic Lardinois | Tech Crunch | June 27, 2016

Google today announced Project Bloks, a new open hardware platform that allows developers, designers and educators to build physical programming experiences that can help kids (5+) learn to code. While Google worked together with design firm IDEO to build a reference kit, the idea here is to provide a platform that others can use to build their own devices. Google’s team provides the basics of the platform, but the team tells me that it doesn’t currently plan to build its own retail version...

Read More »

Health Data Should Belong to Patients, Topol Argues

Angela Woodall | MedCity News | July 21, 2016

The digital revolution’s merging of medicine with high tech has unleashed massive amounts of data about the most intimate details of our life — what we ate, how far we walked, how fast our heart beat. As a result, what constitutes health data is no longer so easily defined. Neither is how the information is used. With rise of machine learning, those questions are becoming increasingly urgent, especially with the move of high tech companies into the clinical sphere, according to health data transparency advocate Dr. Eric Topol...

Read More »

How Congress Ignored Science and Fueled Antibiotic Resistance

Maryn McKenna | Wired | September 12, 2017

The study was being conducted by Dr. Stuart B. Levy, a researcher in Boston. Levy was 36 in 1974. He was the son of a family doctor from Delaware and had grown up accompanying his father on house calls and discussing cases afterward. He was a faculty member at Tufts University School of Medicine, in a part of Boston that is gentrified now but was cheap and seedy then, and he had taken a circuitous route to get there, studying first literature, then medicine, and then microbiology in Italy and France...

Read More »

How Technology Democratised Development

Ken Banks | BBC | September 7, 2012

Over the coming weeks, A Matter of Life and Tech will feature a range of voices from people helping to build Africa’s tech future. This week, mobile innovator Ken Banks argues that technology has become a vital tool in the fight against poverty. Read More »

Kitware Receives DARPA Funding to Develop a Visualization Design Environment

Press Release | Kitware | November 27, 2012

The project seeks to provide researchers with a suite of visualization tools for deeper understanding of complex, large-scale data. Read More »

Kitware to Enhance the Visualization Toolkit (VTK)

Press Release | Kitware | May 7, 2013

New NIH funding for the enhancement and refactoring of the Visualization Toolkit will modernize the platform to maintain its position as the industry standard for advanced medical data visualization. Read More »

NIH Big Data Effort Focuses On Better Knowledge From Existing Data

Susan D.Hall | Fierce Health IT | May 12, 2014

Big data is transforming biomedical research, National Institutes of Health director Francis S. Collins writes in a blog post announcing an initiative called Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K).  To illustrate his point, Collins points to the work of Atul Butte of Stanford University, a NIH-funded researcher looking among mountains of existing data to find new links among genes, diseases and traits.

Read More »