return on investment (ROI)

See the following -

3 Ways Remote Care Helps Patients, Docs

Jeff Rowe | Healthcare IT News | July 26, 2013

Given the steady stream of new devices entering the healthcare market, it might be easy to start thinking improvements in healthcare can come from technological advances alone. But it's more complicated than that. Read More »

8 Factors To Consider Before Taking The Open-Source Software Leap in Healthcare

Renjith Ponnappan | Med Device Online | April 29, 2014

Affordable healthcare is a major concern today, especially for companies developing solutions to enter emerging markets. Global companies are finding it exceedingly difficult to compete in comparatively less-regulated markets, with locally developed products.

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Are EHR Installations Derailing Hospital Finances?

Matt Mattox | Axial Exchange | July 23, 2013

It is an open secret that large EHR installations can cost health systems over $100 million to license and implement. A ticket that large is a material investment for any company on the planet. For a hospital it can be enough to put the bottom line in the red. Read More »

Challenges to Expect When Open Sourcing your SaaS Business

In my previous article, I walked through scenarios to help you determine whether to open source your SaaS solution, and discussed the cost-benefit analysis that goes along with this decision. From an open source point of view, there's no point in just chucking code over the wall, slapping on an open source license, and calling it a day. You want to create an inviting community where people want to collaborate and spend time-even socialize!-with you. Chucking code over the wall accomplishes nothing, besides giving others insight into how you do things. Although that may be interesting and beneficial for them, you don't get much benefit unless you create the pathways of collaboration and communication that unlock a thriving community. Thus, you have an inherent interest in doing this The Right Way™.

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How To Avoid EHR Backlash In The Patient Experience, Clinic

Robert Green | EHR Intelligence | May 28, 2013

The term “EHR backlash” has been used recently to describe the challenges and feelings that physicians associate with their EHR adoptions. It has even reached the point of having its own hashtag on Twitter, #EHRBacklash, with plenty of interest to draw even more attention. [...] However, the term “backlash” may not be the word that best fits the current discourse.... Read More »

How To Ensure New IT Systems In Healthcare Are A Success

Sarah Johnson | The Guardian | October 15, 2014

Sponsored Q&A: Expert views from our live discussion on implementing IT systems...

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MaineHealth Facing Financial Debacle due to Proprietary EHR Install

The scenario: A sophisticated medical center health system begins to roll out an expensive proprietary EHR and shortly thereafter sustains an operating loss, leaving no choice but to put the implementation on hold. The operating loss is attributed to “unintended financial consequences” directly related to buying a very expensive EHR system. This is exactly the situation at MaineHealth, who selected Epic. Read More »

On the Need to Improve User-Centered Design (i.e. Design Thinking) for Healthcare IT Usability

The lack of usability of electronic health records (EHRs) and healthcare IT applications, in general, has been in the news a lot again. This time it is a research report published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) on March 27. The study analyzed voluntary error reports associated with EHR systems and found that problems with EHR usability may have directly resulted in patient harm. Unfortunately, this situation is all too common in the healthcare industry. Numerous health care systems are designed and created ad hoc, or with a very engineering-centric approach. End users are dissatisfied and often systems or workflows are abandoned and/or dangerous work-a-rounds created. A lot of people are saying Healthcare IT needs a disruption. What HealthIT needs is to begin to learn about and understand the needs, goals, and methods of the actual end-users, like doctors, nurses, medical assistants, etc.

Resolutions On EHR Usability, ROI: A Welcome Relief, Or Just Lip Service?

Marla Durben Hirsch | FierceEMR | January 9, 2014

I read with great interest this week's proposals to improve electronic health records in the new year. First we have Jacob Reider, Acting National Coordinator for Health IT, who published a blog post on Jan. 6 acknowledging that EHR usability continues to be an unresolved issue that remains a priority for ONC. [...] Read More »

The (Awesome) Economics of Open Source

Successful open source software companies "discover" markets where transaction costs far outweigh all other costs, outcompete the proprietary alternatives for all the good reasons that even the economic nay-sayers already concede (e.g., open source is simply a better development model to create and maintain higher-quality, more rapidly innovative software than the finite limits of proprietary software), and then-and this is the important bit-help clients achieve strategic objectives using open source as a platform for their own innovation. With open source, better/faster/cheaper by itself is available for the low, low price of zero dollars. As an open source company, we don't cry about that. Instead, we look at how open source might create a new inflection point that fundamentally changes the economics of existing markets or how it might create entirely new and more valuable markets.

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The High Cost Of An EHR Implementation

Gabriel Perna | Healthcare Informatics | September 4, 2014

...You don’t want to make a false move because it could end up costing you—in the wallet and in the metaphorical mind...This is why I have a new appreciation for CIOs and IT leaders in healthcare...

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U.S. Ranks First in Health Care Spending, but Cancer Outcomes Do Not Reflect the Investment, Study Finds

Press Release | National Comprehensive Cancer Network, JNCCN - Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network | August 12, 2016

The U.S. health care system is characterized-on a global level-by its unsustainable health care spending, which does not necessarily correlate to better outcomes in patients with cancer. With $2.9 trillion spent on U.S. health care in 2013, the United States ranks first in health care spending among the world's leading economies. To investigate the implications of socioeconomic status (SES) and health expenditures on cancer outcomes and mortality, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, led by Jad Chahoud, MD, conducted an ecological study at the state level for three distinct patient populations: breast cancer, colorectal cancer, and all-cancer populations..

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Why Health Execs Don't Understand The ROI Of HIT

Jeff Rowe | Government Health IT | October 26, 2012

A new report finds that many healthcare executives are dissatisfied with their organization’s efforts to determine the return on investment (ROI) on recently installed EHR systems. Read More »

Why the A.I. Euphoria Is Doomed to Fail

Evgeny Chereshnev | Venture Beat | September 17, 2016

Investors dropped $681 million into A.I.-centric startups in Silicon Valley last year. This year, the number will likely reach $1.2 billion. Five years ago, total A.I. investment spiked at roughly $150 million. This is how Silicon Valley works: When something new is hyped and seems to have investor trust, everybody jumps on the train without asking, “Where does this train go?”...

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